The Decline Of Detroit

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An iGCSE lesson, setting up an independent learning activity on the decline of Detroit.

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    Decentralisation and deindustrialisation, Objectives: To be able to show the causes and consequences of change of decentralisation in Detroit. To be able to outline subsequent development in the area.
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    Starter: define the key words Decentralisation When industries move from the edge (rural-urban fringe) to the inside of a city When the industries in an area go bankrupt ill Objectives: Deindustrialisation When industries leave an area and it goes into decline. When industries move from the inside to the edge (rural-urban fringe) of a city Ext. task: what has happened here? To be able to show the causes and consequences of change of decentralisation in Detroit. To be able to outline subsequent development in the area,
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    The rise and fall of Detroit / Motor City 1903 Ford starts the Ford Motor Co. in Detroit; 1908 William Durant and Charles Stewart Mott found General Motors 1915 John and Horace Dodge found Dodge Motor Company in Detroit 1925 Walter Chrysler starts the Chrysler Corp. in Detroit. 1950 population hits 1.85 million, America's 4th biggest city, 296,000 manufacturing jobs. 1958 The 3,500,000-square-foot Packard Motor Car Co. factory, is shut. 1959 Berry Gordy founds Motown Records. He names the record company's center of operations — a two-story house at 2648 West Grand Boulevard — "Hitsville USA 1962 GM, Dodge, Ford, Chrysler and Cadillac are all based in the suburbs of Detroit. 150,000 jobs cut due to mass production. 1967 The Twelfth Street riot, one of the biggest in U.S. history, pits inner-city workers against police and National Guard troops. 43 people are killed, 467 injured, and more than 7,200 arrested. 2,000 buildings are destroyed. 1970 Most wealthy, middle class people have left the city. Unemployment soars as small businesses go too. 1973-74 The oil crises help give smaller, more fuel-efficient European and Japanese cars a place in the U.S., signaling a long period of crisis for Detroit's Big Three automakers. July 1992 Moody's cuts Detroit's debt rating to junk status. December 2008 President Bush gives a provisional $17.4 billion bailout to GM and Chrysler. July 2009 Chrysler and GM declare bankruptcy. January 2010 Unemployment hits 44.8% and the average 2 bedroom house costs $7,500 March 2011 population has fallen to 713,777, and the lowest level in 100 years. Most of the city lies abandoned. July 18, 2013 Detroit is bankrupt
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    Is Detroit bouncing back? Rock bottom prices attract investors. Dan Gilbert, a Detroit born billionaire, has pumped $1.7bn into buying up 70 major buildings and has promised to restore them to their former glory. Quicken Loans has moved thousands of employees downtown and the Gilbert is now encouraging other businesses to follow suit through his "Opportunity Detroit" scheme. Gentrification Street art is flourishing in the and trendy cafes and restaurants have been springing up in increasing number as budding entrepreneurs enjoy cheap rents and low start-up and staffing costs. In the 2016 alone, 30 restaurants have opened up and Detroit is now home to the highest concentration of designers in the US. There are also 1,300 urban community farms (where buildings used to be) that produce enough fruit and vegetables to supply 20% of the city. Art is also flourishing. The Heidelberg project, designed to improve peoples' lives through art, is just one of a number of creative initiatives. Murals, graffiti and street art are spearheading Detroit's beautification. Objectives: To be able to show the causes and consequences of change of decentralisation in Detroit. To be able to outline subsequent development in the area,
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    Independent learning What does gentrification mean? 1. 2. 3. Objectives: Detroit in 1920s - 1950s Detroit in 1970s — 1980s Detroit in 2010 - today Why did Detroit decline? How is Detroit getting better? Google: Decline of Detroit, Gentrification Detroit, Object Orange, Murals in Detroit To be able to show the causes and consequences of change of decentralisation in Detroit. To be able to outline subsequent development in the area,

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